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Information in English

After 123 years of occupation, Poland finally reappeared on the world map in 1918. The struggle of generations of Poles to preserve their culture within the three empires of Austria, Prussia and Russia was extremely difficult. Austrian occupation was the least severe, as it allowed Polish universities and Polish representation in their parliament. The other two occupiers aimed to crush Polish pride, confiscated property, disallowed education in the mother-tongue, deported for hard labour, forced into military service – all as a plan of Russification and Germanization, with the aim of de-polonization of the culture. During this tough and dramatic period many of the Polish intelligentsia, writers, artists, noblemen and poets were forced to emigrate. Polish soldiers were participating in various conflicts around Europe, seeking a chance to alter the international situation, including fighting alongside Napoleon and taking part in the Hungarian Revolution in 1848 under the slogan of “For your freedom and ours”.

Polish Independence Day, the 11th of November, officially celebrated since 1919, is a key moment in the hearts of all Poles. The celebration had not been solemnised for long, as the Second World War came to us from West and East and Poland fell under the occupation of Soviet Russia. Between 1945 and 1989 Poland was terrorised by the communist regime and any sign of national identity met with harsh punishments, such as threats, imprisonment, tortures and death. Obviously, the Polish Independence Day was strictly disallowed.

After the fall of communism the celebration of one of the most important dates in Polish history was brought back to life. Two Polish nationalist organisations, Młodzież Wszechpolska and Obóz Narodowo-Radykalny, although not as strong as before the war, because their members were to a large degree exterminated by the Germans and Communists, have come together to organise the celebration of the anniversary each year by so called the Independence March. People of all social backgrounds, students, workers, the elderly and the war veterans, musicians, politicians, writers, different patriotic and national organisations, families with children all gather in order to manifest their Polish pride.

We want to prove that the effort of our forefathers, patriots who never lost the hope in freedom and independence, was not wasted. We would like to show that the blood of many millions of Polish people throughout the centuries, who only wanted their children and grandchildren to be able to speak Polish and be proud of who they are, was not spilled for nothing. Our Honourable Support Committee consists of Polish finest war veterans that live until this very day, that struggled in the battle against nazis and communists. Their support and appearance at the March standing next to us side by side is the greatest honour we could have ever imagined.

The Independence March has given rise to many controversies, as Polish communist, radical leftist, anarchist terrorist organizations (e.g. antifa) and other brainwashed individuals do not believe in the pride of their own country and each year plan to block and attack the legal patriotic march. Unfortunately, some newspapers in Poland, sponsored by Germans and international leftist business, financially support the masked and hooded thugs that form illegal anti-Polish gangs and groups, which aim to cause riots.

Last year we aimed to see 11 thousands of patriots at our march. More than 20 thousands arrived (including Hungarians, Swedes, Serbians and many other friendly nations), which was a number beyond anybody’s expectations. Radical anarchists from Germany were so overwhelmed, scared and aggressive, they even attacked random reconstruction groups of Napoleonic soldiers, spitting on their uniforms. After this unfortunate event they all hid in the building of „Krytyka Polityczna”, the Polish communist group sponsored by the Polish state from the taxes of Polish people. Polish President Bronisław Komorowski, after witnessing the potential and might of the Independence March, decided that he will not allow any other civil marches of this sort, and the next Independence March will be organised by him, Polish pseudo-elites, post-communists and liberals. He has a sense of humour, because on 11.11.12 WE will show the whole world, that Polish people do not want any more fake idols, do not want any more demoliberalism, do not want a weak country, but demand a strong, independent and powerful Poland!

Are we going to allow them to crush Polish identity? Are we going to allow them to spit on the graves of our ancestors? Or are we going to grab a Polish flag, show up at the demonstration and march together with thousands of like-minded people in the potentially greatest march of national pride in Europe?

All organisations and individuals from Europe and the world who share common values are welcome to join us. We will provide translators, information about the cheapest shelters and places to eat. Poland is known for its hospitality, fantastic food and drinks, therefore you shouldn’t waste such a chance to try what we are the best at. Other surprises and fun events on the day and evening should be provided. Any banners and flags that you wish to bring need to be shown before to the organizers of the March.

Please keep in mind that the organisers reserve the right to a removal of any individual without giving an immediate justification.

If you have any questions, you want to declare your visit or you wish to contact us, please e-mail: [email protected]